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6 Results for "by Michele Foster"

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Family Fun Seeker Itinerary Builder: Places to Go, Things to Do, Events and City Parks

by Michele Foster Use this itinerary builder to plan your family fun trip to Ventura, California! San Buenaventura State Beach, Historic Pier and Promenade Areas San Buenaventura State Beach A two-mile-long stretch of wide sandy beach, offering a range of family-friendly fun, including fishing, swimming, picnicking, bicycling and volleyball, among other outdoor activities. Set back...

DIY Specialty Food, Wine and Craft Beer Enthusiast Itinerary

blog by Michele Foster top image by Steve Cattanach Saturday is a great day to explore the rich specialty food, wine and craft beer scene in Ventura. 1. Start early Saturday morning at the Harbor Village Fisherman’s Market to take in the amazing variety of fresh seafood brought in by...

Itinerary Builder for the Arts and Culture Enthusiast

by Michele Foster Find a listing of Ventura arts and culture stops that you can add to your itinerary. Let us know if we missed anything! Galleries and Studios Many of the studios and exhibit spaces are by appointment only. Please call to verify hours before planning your visits. West...

Everything you need to know to plan a top-notch foodie itinerary

by Michele Foster Specialty Foods Paradise Pantry Restaurant and Cheese Shop Quality & palate driven, with a menu inspired by the artisan culture of Europe and the Mediterranean, the owners of Paradise Pantry are devoted to sharing their passion for fine foods. Their menu features an array of Ventura County’s...

Our Glorious Landmark

by Michele Foster San Buenaventura’s historic City Hall was built from 1912 to 1913, originally to house the Ventura County Courthouse. By that time, the area over which it presided had been a center of civilization for centuries. First, as a locus for the indigenous Chumash culture; and, later, in...

The Historic Moreton Bay Fig Tree in Ventura California

by Michele Foster Eucalyptus trees are now ubiquitous in California and it is commonly known that they were introduced during the Gold Rush era in hopes of providing fast growing timber for railroad ties.  While they didn’t quite work out for that purpose, they remain and have become a elemental part our southern California landscape....